Digikids and the quandry of the declining literacy levels

I watched the Four Corners ‘Digikids’ program last night and it got me thinking, as I’m prone to do, about the various literacy debates and where we’re heading.

To begin with, I felt like the program lacked a clear focus – it was about declining literacy levels but skipped from questioning whether this was a lack of direct phonics instruction to how well prepared teaching graduates are to what influence technology has on the whole equation.

And then I realised that perhaps that’s actually the crux of it – literacy education is complex with so many contributing factors. To run a story on just one component would have been an attempt to oversimplify a challenging issue with so many threads, yet that’s so often what people try to do.

Early on in the program, that comment was made that “the current system isn’t working for every child” and I absolutely and wholeheartedly agree with this. However I don’t know that any one system ever will as students are all different, bringing a range of skills, experiences and dispositions so it is fair to assume that ‘one size fits all’ won’t work. While we also know a lot of about the elements that make reading instruction effective thanks to extensive research on the topic, there’s still ample discussion on how much of each element is needed and how they should be delivered. The way I see it, the key elements of reading instruction are the proven science of reading and the combination of how much, how often and what it looks like in the classroom are the art.

I have no intention to get into a ‘phonics vs …’ debate because I don’t understand why it has to be phonics vs anything. Why can’t it be phonics + other things? Reading is a complex act that involves not only working out what the squiggles on a page say but also what they mean directly and through implication. Phonics definitely has an important role to play but I’ve also experienced students who arrive in Grade 5 believing they are star readers because they can decode every word of complex text yet can’t tell you a single thing about what they’ve read. I’m also dubious of any method being suggested that involves a whole class of students sitting in front of a teacher repeating sounds over and over with no consideration of what they already know. Where I’ve seen direct phonics instruction be particularly effective it was with small groups of students where sounds and the required practise could be targeted to their needs and gaps.

I also couldn’t help but be plagued with an overwhelming feeling that some people are longing to turn back time to a utopian era where everyone was literate….that never actually existed. Implying that the current system is the only one that has ever ‘failed’ students is wrong – educational history is littered with people who didn’t achieve equally.

So I finish watching still with many, many wonderings and I think that’s a good thing.  One of my wonderings I’ll just leave hanging here as a blog post for another time – are literacy levels actually dropping or is what being literate looks like changing in our modern, digital world?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s