How to grow your own word detective

I haven’t always been passionately interested in spelling. During my first year or two of teaching, I will admit to being similar to so many teachers – frustrated with my student’s attempts, reaching for commercial spelling programs and over-reliant on the ‘look cover write check’ method.

Initially, I put it down to the fact that I had been one of those children who ‘just got it’ when it came to spelling. And reading and writing for that matter. But it wasn’t something I was born with – it was a product of the environment I came from.

From a very young age, I saw the power that words held. They mesmerised my Mum when she relaxed on the couch and read, ignoring whatever yells and screams were coming from me and my sisters as we fought over something petty on rainy afternoons. They earned praise for my sister when she brought home writing from school to show my parents – those words on the page made them smile and say how proud they were of her. And they earned a lot less praise for my other sister when she brought home her school report. I didn’t know what the words said but Mum & Dad clearly did and it wasn’t good. Powerful things, those words.

Growing up, I began to understand how certain words could achieve different things, depending on where they were used and who you gave them to. If I used certain words or phrases at school, teachers listened to me more (for positive and not so positive reasons) and different words and phrases would get me attention at home. A whole other set worked with my peers. As a teenager, I realised that using a certain tone in my speaking and writing made others see me differently and allowed me to build a picture of who I wanted to be, no longer limited by socio-economic or geographic limitations. I saw the power of words take my sister through Year 12 and into University.

Wanting to use and play with that power, I chose to become a journalist where words were my only tool and the product that I spent so long crafting each day.

So I didn’t just ‘get’ reading, writing and spelling. I was raised in a literacy rich household where I had daily demonstrations of the power and wonder of language, almost guaranteed to make me curious. And my reflections on my journey through word curiosity is why I now am so passionate about spelling and words and literacy in general. Ultimately, language has power, whatever age you are and whatever your postcode is. Some children are fortunate enough to be born into environments swimming with rich examples, while others get demonstrations of how limiting it can be when you hold an incomplete set of tools or the wrong ones to do the tasks that you need. Getting children excited about words helps them fill their own toolbox and unlock that magical power that language holds. How can you not be passionate about that?

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s