ALEA conference – Day 3

The final day at the ALEA conference was shorter but just as rich as the previous 2 with a large range of keynotes and workshops available – too many good ones to choose from!

Deepening comprehension through digital inquiry, collaboration & participation – Julie Coiro

Julie started the day with a focus on comprehension of digital, specifically online, texts. I was very interested in some of the research she quoted which stated that, while 35% of the reading comprehension required for online texts could be predicted by a student’s offline comprehension, 15% required a different skillset unique to the online environment. Worryingly, 18% of student’s assessed in one study couldn’t name the author of a website while a staggering 73% of them couldn’t offer any evaluation of the author’s expertise. These insights present us with a challenge – how to teach the broad range of comprehension skills needed for both online and offline texts?

Julie walked us through how to use the familiar gradual release of responsibility model when teaching students about online inquiry. Using scaffolds such as Google custom searches and initial use of more structured, authentic tasks to guide students through the process both support the development of important skills and can be used at all levels.

I was also lucky enough to attend Julie’s workshop session in the afternoon which stepped in more detail through the process of guiding an online inquiry. Various resources demonstrating this can be found at this site, as well as some great support materials here and here.

Importantly, it’s the fact that there is so much ‘more’ when reading online that makes it challenging and we need to help our students learn how to successfully navigate, evaluate and filter the information and resources they need.

For the love of words: Fostering curiosity about spelling in the primary classroom – Sami Wansink

This was a workshop being run by an early career teacher with a incredible passion and clearly a very sound understanding of both content and pedagogy. Most of this workshop was already familiar but I’m really glad I attended anyway – it reminded me how important it is to get students excited about words and to do all we can to wash away the stigma of spelling which so often lingers.

CAFE: Empower students to take an active role in setting goals for literacy improvement – Joan Moser and Gail Boushey

I had been really looking forward to this keynote and wasn’t disappointed – I was very lucky to get a seat as it was clearly a very popular session.

I’m not particularly familiar with the CAFE model, other than that I’ve heard teachers talk about, usually in glowing terms. I suppose my biggest reason to attend this session was curiosity – both about the model and about ways I can support my staff with conferencing.

Joan and Gail spoke about the CAFE model generally but were specifically focused on what conferences with students looked like within this. What appealed most was that their advice was firmly grounded in both more formal research and in searching for solutions to problems they have experience in the classroom.

They talked through the whole process – from assessing individual, through discussing and setting goals with students to reviewing goals and modifying instruction. They talked about their own experiences in setting goals but not getting anywhere, only to realise the goals were too large and the strategies not specific enough. This led to their guiding question – what are the 2 strategies that the student needs in the next 2 weeks that would make the biggest difference in their reading?

Another key point for was about how voracious our readers need to be. While I’ve certainly moved students forward and set goals in their reading, I don’t know that I’ve been specific about page numbers and quantity however research from Richard Allington shows that the amount and the speed that students read both have an impact on their reading skills.

And so ends the ALEA conference for another year. As usual, it has been a rich and thought provoking few days which have reinforced some of my beliefs and practices and challenged others. I’ve also really valued the networking opportunities with colleagues across a diverse range of settings. Well done ALEA & I hope to see you in Adelaide next year!

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