Australian Literacy Educators’ Association conference – Day 1

My head is buzzing after the first day of the ALEA conference in Canberra. I really value conferences such as this for the opportunity to share ideas and learn from teacher and researcher leaders in my field. Invariably, I walk away feeling energised and with a renewed sense of enthusiasm.

So, what were the key points of today?

Children writing with new technologies – Lisa Kervin

How can we nurture children as authors in our classrooms? This question summed up the heart of the keynote by Lisa Kervin for me and got me thinking about how children’s writing is seen and valued in the classrooms I work in. It can be very easy for teachers to get caught up in teaching and focusing on the mechanics of writing and, without meaning to, lose focus on the intentions and process of the young authors creating the texts. The words we use, the reactions we give, our discussions during the process and what we do at the end of it all help shape how these authors see themselves as writers and their understanding of and beliefs about writing. Do we have children write texts that end up scrunched up in the bottom of a school bag or piled on the teacher’s desk but soon forgotten or are they treasured products delivered to their intended audiences?

In particular, Lisa drew attention to the multimodal nature of texts and the role that technology plays in every aspect of the writing process. From my coaching experiences, I know that teachers are mostly confident in jumping to technology for publishing (albeit only on Word) but Lisa demonstrated how different tools are used by authors of all ages at all stages of the writing process. Planning through mindmapping tools like Popplet and researching using tools like Instagrok; browsing for & creating visual images to support the message & audio recording pre-writing notes and thoughts – all of these come long before the final product but are crucial to its development. In many ways, they reshape the writing process and make it more recursive and flexible than ever, with planning, drafting, revising and editing all streaming into one another. Overarching the process are the purpose, audience and form – the key factors that the author needs to have had in mind from the start and continue to reflect during every decision through to publication.

All of that reminded me that writing is beautiful and complicated, a fact that Donald Graves summed up nicely:

Writing is an organic process that frustrates approaches to explain its operation

A fabulous, thought provoking keynote….and that was only the start of my day!!

Improving Student Literacy Outcomes through the Development of Dialogic Classroom Talk Practices – Geoff Bull & Michèle Anstey

I had seen Geoff and Michele before so was really looking forward to their session and wasn’t disappointed. They talked about the predominance of classrooms characterised by monologic talk and initiation-response-evaluation (IRE) type interactions – you know the ones. Where the teacher asks a question (which they already know the answer to), a student responds and the teacher gives some evaluation (eg, ‘well done’ or ‘that’s right’ or ‘not quite…’). At best, students get to say a few words during these interactions and those words are directed by the teacher. Research in this area shows that up to 90% of talk in the classroom can consist of these type of interactions.

Instead, they spoke about moving to including more dialogic talk – where students and teachers have genuine dialogue with both making substantial contributions, both to the direction and content of the talk. This doesn’t mean talk that goes off on tangents (“Yeah, I used to have a dog! It’s name was Jack….”) – dialogic talk still has purpose and direction but the path to get there is more flexible and reciprocal.

To develop this, the classroom climate is crucial – students won’t suddenly start having rich discussions with each other or with the teacher just because you want them to. By even the early years of schooling, students have learnt a lot about what talk is valued in classrooms and how to respond – if I put my hand up, I might get asked to respond and the teacher will decide whether it’s right. If it’s not, they’ll keep asking someone until they get the answer they want. Creating a classroom climate for dialogic talk involves building an environment where students feel comfortable and safe to talk and aren’t concerned about making mistakes or being contradicted. Importantly, classrooms with dialogic talk depend on the teacher getting off the stage and creating space for students to talk. There was also a lot of references to this book which I own but is on my ‘to read’ pile – I shall definitely be pushing it to the top!

See what I mean about a buzzing head – this was my first couple of hours of the day!

To avoid this turning into an essay rather than a blog post, I’m going to stop there, even though my day was far from done. After lunch, I was lucky enough to see the keynote with Kath Murdoch who is always inspirational and full of thought provoking ideas. So I’ll leave you with one about how to help children remain curious as they grow:

Be curious ourselves – and show it

curiosity

Photo courtesy of Brian Donovan shared under Creative Commons license CC BY-SA 2.0

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